Playing card holder

When it’s raining, I like to play games inside. I prefer card games like Uno or Skipbo. If you have played these games with kids, you know they often struggle to hold all cards in their hands or to hide them from the other players. If you have small hands yourself, you might know this problem too ;). That’s how I came up with the idea to make this playing card holder…

playing card holder

  • You start by cutting all different parts, shown in these instructions. You can softly draw the dashed lines on the tissue, this is where the stitches will come.
  • Then you apply all pieces to the front part: stitch the Velcro on the bottom and the 3 strips on lines A, B and C. On the beforehand I stitched a bias on top of these strips.
  • On the back part, you only need to stitch Velcro on the topside.
  • When all pieces are applied, take the front and back and put them wrong sides facing. I secured both parts to each other using paperclips. Now you can stitch it together by sewing over lines C, D and E.
  • Next, sew the bias starting in the lower right corner. Follow the direction of the red arrow in the instructions. Stop at the upper right corner, needle in your tissue.
  • Now you can estimate the size of the cardboard, which I used for strengthening. This depends namely on how precise you worked. Take the dimensions between your stiches minus around 0,50 cm. Cut out the cardboard and shove it between the two parts.
  • To finish, you continue stitching the bias.
Playing card holder

Since you can fold the holder, it doesn’t take too much space

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Bikecap

Since you don’t change bike every now and then, I love to add cute accessories to cheer it up. I already made a basket and bags.  Now I made a bike seat cover.

What you will be needing

  • Strip of oilcloth, 9 by 100 cm
  • Saddleshaped piece of oilcloth
  • Elastic, 1,5 cm wide and 1 m long

You start with stitching the elastic on the border of the long strip its back. Make sure you put enough pressure on the elastic, otherwise the bikecap will be too loose.

Then you have to stitch the strip on the saddlepiece, wrong sides facing. Start in the middle of the back of the seat. Don’t stitch the first centimeters of the strip yet. Try not to stitch too fast, in order to be able to follow the shape better.

When you are at the end, cut the rest of the strip, leaving again a few centimeters. Once you have stitched the ends of the strip together, your bikecap is ready!

This cap will help you find your bike back in the bike rack more easy and prevent your saddle form getting wet…